Science Museum and South London Gallery named Museum of the Yr winners | London night commonplace

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two London museums were named Art Fund Museum of the Year.

Judges said the science museum enjoyed a “landmark year in which the museum inspired the next generation of scientists.”

They named the South Kensington Museum “the world’s premier travel destination for people who are passionate about, inspired and inspired by science,” including the highlight of the Tim Peake spacecraft’s nationwide tour, their biggest stopover for the Apollo 11 anniversary, as examples the opening of two extraordinary new permanent galleries – Medicine: The Wellcome Galleries and Science City 1550-1800: The Linbury Gallery.

The South London Gallery, which received government funding through the Culture Recovery Fund, recently doubled in size with the opening of a neighboring location in a former fire station. The jury praised it as a “world-class space for contemporary art, built for and with its culturally diverse communities”, which “sees promoting inclusion as the core of its mission”.

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The South London Gallery / PA

Jenny Waldman, Director of Art Fund, said: “The winners are exceptional examples of museums that provide inspiration, reflection and joy in the heart of communities. British museums – admired worldwide and vital locally – flourished before Covid-19. They can help rebuild our communities and trust when we get out of the virus. But they are in financial danger.

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“Not only do we need sustainable investment from the government, we encourage everyone to explore their local museum – they need our support now.”

The Aberdeen Art Gallery, Towner Eastbourne and the Gairloch Museum also received a share of the fund.

All five winners will host digital events and activities this week to celebrate their victory, including storytelling by Outlander star Sam Heughan, an arts and sustainability panel discussion with Caroline Lucas chaired by David Dimbleby, a live archaeological dig and a “Museum Mindfulness”. Retreat”.