The Backyard Bridge mission in London has been formally deserted after £37million in public prices

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The Backyard Bridge mission in London has been formally deserted after £37million in public prices

The Garden Bridge project in London has been officially abandoned after £37million in public costs

Courtesy of Garden Bridge Trust

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https://www.archdaily.com/877692/londons-garden-bridge-project-officially-axed-after-37-pounds-million-in-public-costs

The saga of London’s controversial Thames Garden Bridge project has finally come to an end as the Garden Bridge Trust has announced the official “completion of the project” after losing support from the public and London Mayor Sadiq Khan.

“It is with great regret that the Trustees have come to the conclusion that the project cannot go ahead without the Mayor’s support,” said Lord Mervyn Davies, Chair of the Garden Bridge Trust, in a statement released today.

“We are incredibly saddened that we have not been able to realize the Garden Bridge dream and that the Mayor is unable to continue the initial support.”

London's Garden Bridge project officially scrapped after £37m public cost - More pictures+ 4

Courtesy of Garden Bridge Trust

Khan officially withdrew support for the project earlier this year, citing rising construction costs and potential maintenance issues, detailed in an April report by Labor MP Margaret Hodge. A reported £37million in public funds has already been spent on the project, money that cannot be recovered.

“It is my duty to ensure that taxpayers’ money is spent responsibly,” Khan said. “Even before I became Mayor I was aware that no more London taxpayer money should be spent on this project and when I took office I gave the Garden Bridge Trust time to try to address the numerous serious issues addressing problems with it.”

Courtesy of Garden Bridge TrustCourtesy of Garden Bridge Trust

British architect Thomas Heatherwick’s ambitious project was first unveiled in 2013 as the result of a Transport for London competition. Early proponents believed the bridge would boost tourism and serve as useful pedestrian infrastructure, while critics saw it as a “vanity project” in a neighborhood already well connected by a number of bridges, and questions about the legitimacy of the procurement process led to a further loss public and official support.

“The Garden Bridge would have been a unique place; a beautiful new green space in the heart of London, free to use and open to all, showcasing the very best of British talent and innovation,” continued Davies. “This is all the more disappointing given that the Trust was set up at the request of TfL, the organization led by the Mayor, to run the project. It’s a sad day for London because it sends a message to the world that we can no longer deliver such exciting projects.”

Unfortunately we are closing. We cannot make the Garden Bridge dream come true without the support of @MayorofLondon https://t.co/k1LHjKmTdH

— Garden Bridge Trust (@TheGardenBridge) August 14, 2017

Read the full statement from the trust here.

News via The Guardian, BBC.