The London widow is sounding the alarm over the brand new care legislation

0
106

Breadcrumb Trail Links

Jane Berges does not want other Ontario families to be left without a choice in her care.

Publication date:

August 31, 20223 days ago2 minutes read 12 comments Kensington Village Long Term Care Home in London. (Derek Ruttan/The London Free Press)

content of the article

Jane Berges does not want other Ontario families to be left without a choice in her care.

advertising 2

This ad has not yet loaded, but your article continues below.

content of the article

Berges – whose husband died in April after committing a hasty, misinformed transfer from a London hospital to a care home – is deeply concerned that Bill 7, which improves hospitals’ ability to transfer patients requiring out-of-hospital support, will fall need, will harm families .

By clicking the subscribe button, you agree to receive the above newsletter from Postmedia Network Inc. You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link at the bottom of our emails. Postmedia Network Inc | 365 Bloor Street East, Toronto, Ontario, M4W 3L4 | 416-383-2300

content of the article

“I’m filled with guilt that I let him go there and anger that this happened in the first place,” she said Wednesday.

Berges claims her husband, Don Wilson, 83, was transferred from the hospital without consultation, only to fall at the severely understaffed facility and fracture his hip, dying in hospital weeks later.

He was hospitalized again, but his condition worsened and he died on April 15.

Berges was moved to contact London West New Democrat MP Peggy Sattler. Sattler brought up Berges’ story during Question Time in Queen’s Park on Wednesday, hours before the controversial law was passed by Doug Ford’s majority-Progressive Conservative government.

advertising 3

This ad has not yet loaded, but your article continues below.

content of the article

Wilson was picking up a prescription on a windy day in late February when the car door swung and hit him, Berges said. He tried to recover at home for two days before being rushed to the hospital and diagnosed with a fractured pelvis.

Wilson was admitted to the London Health Sciences Center and after a few days required rehabilitation support instead of acute hospital care.

He agreed to be transferred to a London care home for a short period of rehabilitation, Berges said, but the couple felt rushed by the decision. They weren’t presented with options or given much time to pursue their own care support, she said.

LHSC declined to comment on the Wilson case Wednesday, citing patient privacy and confidentiality.

“The LHSC is part of a provincial healthcare system that allows us to work with partner hospitals and long-term care homes to ensure Ontario patients receive quality care based on acuity and available resources,” the hospital said in an E -Mail statement.

“We recognize that transfers can be a cause for concern for patients and their families. Staff are consulting with the patient and family and are committed to working to address concerns.”

advertising 4

This ad has not yet loaded, but your article continues below.

content of the article

Kensington Village, the long-term care facility where Wilson was sent, was woefully understaffed, Berges said, with two personal caregivers for 30 residents. The unit was in the midst of a COVID-19 outbreak at the time of his move, Berges said, leaving residents isolated in their rooms.

“There was almost no care,” she said.

In a statement emailed on Wednesday, a Kensington Village spokesman said it “cannot comment on the health status or private health information of residents” or the situation described in Sattler’s remarks at Question Time.

Wilson suffered from a urinary tract infection he contracted while he was at the facility, and less than a week into his stay, Burges said she received a call at 4 a.m. that her husband had fallen out of bed and the broke left hip. He was hospitalized again, where health care workers tried to stabilize him, she said.

“That hip fracture was such a trauma,” Berges said. “We had a life together. He went to the Masters when Tiger Woods won. We were together 50 years. I beat myself up for letting him leave the hospital.”

Share this article on your social network

advertisement

This ad has not yet loaded, but your article continues below.

Display 1

This ad has not yet loaded, but your article continues below.

Comments

Postmedia strives to maintain a vibrant but civilized forum for discussion and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour to be moderated before they appear on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We’ve turned on email notifications – you’ll now receive an email when you get a reply to your comment, there’s an update on a comment thread you follow, or when a user you follow comments follows. For more information and details on how to customize your email settings, see our Community Guidelines.