Wait a minute, a herd of cheeky deer are settling right into a backyard in East London

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You have visitors! In one moment, a herd of cheeky stags settle into an East London garden while happily eating all the roses and nibbling on grass

  • The herd of cheeky stags were spotted nibbling on grass in an east London garden
  • Footage shows the moment the animals ate all the roses in Havering Garden
  • Herde is filmed enjoying a stroll through the Harold Hill neighborhood in the sun

A herd of deer have been spotted cozying up in an east London area and taking time out to relax in someone’s garden.

Footage shared online shows the moment passerby Danny Jackson spotted the intruders nibbling on an unsuspecting person’s grass and carefully manicured rose bushes in Harold Hill, Havering, over the weekend.

He filmed the herd standing in the garden enjoying the sun on Saturday morning.

The deer were seen eating grass and roses in an unsuspecting person’s front yard

Mr Jackson, a wedding photographer, said he thought the heatwave had dried out their usual grazing lands and they had ventured onto the property for a bite to eat

They chewed grass and plants in gardens in Harold Hill, Havering, east London

They chewed grass and plants in gardens in Harold Hill, Havering, east London

The footage shows the five male deer trimming the bushes and grass and having breakfast together.

Mr. Jackson walks very close to the herd, which spots him but pays no attention.

He can be heard saying, “What a day without my camera. Luckily I have a phone.

“There are five men here. You’ve probably eaten every rose in this lady’s front yard.

“It’s pretty early. It’s eight in the morning. There aren’t many people around so I’m guessing that’s the time of day they do. [Maybe] They go down all the streets. I’ve seen some people walking around and they completely ignore them, so I guess that happens a lot.

In another bizarre frame from the footage, the deer can be seen in someone’s driveway.

Together they walk between the gardens through a gap in the fence.

The herd was filmed by passerby Danny Jackson, who was surprised to see the unusual scene unfold on a quiet suburban street

The herd was filmed by passerby Danny Jackson, who was surprised to see the unusual scene unfold on a quiet suburban street

The herd were spotted making themselves at home in a London suburb

The herd were spotted making themselves at home in a London suburb

They were filmed going from lot to lot through gaps in fences and even jumping over small walls

They were filmed going from lot to lot through gaps in fences and even jumping over small walls

Mr Jackson, a wedding photographer, was delivering pictures to a client when he spotted the unusual guests.

“I was delivering some photos to a client in Harold Hill when I noticed the deer,” said Canvey Island’s Mr Jackson.

“There’s a forest nearby, but I’ve never noticed them that far into the property.”

“I suppose the recent heatwave has dried up their usual grazing lands and that’s why they’ve ventured further in.

“I spent some time following them as they traveled from garden to garden. Once they entered a garden with several rose bushes and ate all the roses.

“They seemed quite unfazed by me as they walked and occasionally jumped over the small wall dividing the properties.

“They reminded me of a group of rebellious teenagers up to no good.”

Mr Jackson said the visitors reminded him of a

Mr Jackson said the visitors reminded him of a “group of rebellious teenagers up to no good”.

Mr Jackson was able to get quite close to the herd, which he said ignored him or others passing by

Mr Jackson was able to get quite close to the herd, which he said ignored him or others passing by

Deer have been known to sneak into gardens at night to eat garden plants

Deer have been known to sneak into gardens at night to eat garden plants

Mr Jackson said the cheeky deer ate an entire rosebush in one person's front yard

Mr Jackson said the cheeky deer ate an entire rosebush in one person’s front yard

Deer have been known to sneak into gardens at night to eat garden plants.

The Royal Horticultural Society has previously said that prize roses are a particular target for hungry deer, alongside geraniums and camellias.

Gardeners wishing to protect their handwork may be advised to replace these flowers with Daphne, Buddleia and Globe Thistle, which are less popular and eaten much less frequently.